Saturday, October 4, 2014

WISHBONE


YES
NO

How to Make a Wish on a Wishbone




How to Make a Wish on a Wishbone thumbnail
The proper way to pull a wishbone.
Making a wish on a wishbone dates back 2,400 years to the Etruscans in Italy, according to Charles Panati, author of the book, "Extraordinary Origins of Everyday Things." They believed the cock and hen were soothsayers who could predict the future and practiced a tradition called the "hen oracle," which was similar to the Ouija board, but with a hen and grains of corn. When one of these sacred birds were killed, the collarbone was dried and the Etruscans stroked it to make a wish. There were only a few sacred fowl collarbones to go around, thus starting the practice of breaking them. The Romans brought the tradition to England, where it is referred to as a "merrythought." The Pilgrims brought the tradition to America, using the turkeys they found in the wooded northeast area where they settled. We assume they snapped wishbones at the first Thanksgiving in 1621.


Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_8050616_make-wish-wishbone.html


Making a wish on a wishbone dates back 2,400 years to the Etruscans in Italy, according to Charles Panati, author of the book, "Extraordinary Origins of Everyday Things." They believed the cock and hen were soothsayers who could predict the future and practiced a tradition called the "hen oracle," which was similar to the Ouija board, but with a hen and grains of corn. When one of these sacred birds were killed, the collarbone was dried and the Etruscans stroked it to make a wish. There were only a few sacred fowl collarbones to go around, thus starting the practice of breaking them. The Romans brought the tradition to England, where it is referred to as a "merrythought." The Pilgrims brought the tradition to America, using the turkeys they found in the wooded northeast area where they settled. We assume they snapped wishbones at the first Thanksgiving in 1621.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_8050616_make-wish-wishbone.html



Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_8050616_make-wish-wishbone.htm
Making a wish on a wishbone dates back 2,400 years to the Etruscans in Italy, according to Charles Panati, author of the book, "Extraordinary Origins of Everyday Things." They believed the cock and hen were soothsayers who could predict the future and practiced a tradition called the "hen oracle," which was similar to the Ouija board, but with a hen and grains of corn. When one of these sacred birds were killed, the collarbone was dried and the Etruscans stroked it to make a wish. There were only a few sacred fowl collarbones to go around, thus starting the practice of breaking them. The Romans brought the tradition to England, where it is referred to as a "merrythought." The Pilgrims brought the tradition to America, using the turkeys they found in the wooded northeast area where they settled. We assume they snapped wishbones at the first Thanksgiving in 1621.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_8050616_make-wish-wishbone.html
I've made many a wish on a wishbone...

Making a wish on a wishbone dates back 2,400 years to the Etruscans in Italy, according to Charles Panati, author of the book, "Extraordinary Origins of Everyday Things." They believed the cock and hen were soothsayers who could predict the future and practiced a tradition called the "hen oracle," which was similar to the Ouija board, but with a hen and grains of corn. When one of these sacred birds were killed, the collarbone was dried and the Etruscans stroked it to make a wish. There were only a few sacred fowl collarbones to go around, thus starting the practice of breaking them. The Romans brought the tradition to England, where it is referred to as a "merrythought." The Pilgrims brought the tradition to America, using the turkeys they found in the wooded northeast area where they settled. We assume they snapped wishbones at the first Thanksgiving in 1621.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_8050616_make-wish-wishbone.html
Making a wish on a wishbone dates back 2,400 years to the Etruscans in Italy, according to Charles Panati, author of the book, "Extraordinary Origins of Everyday Things." They believed the cock and hen were soothsayers who could predict the future and practiced a tradition called the "hen oracle," which was similar to the Ouija board, but with a hen and grains of corn. When one of these sacred birds were killed, the collarbone was dried and the Etruscans stroked it to make a wish. There were only a few sacred fowl collarbones to go around, thus starting the practice of breaking them. The Romans brought the tradition to England, where it is referred to as a "merrythought." The Pilgrims brought the tradition to America, using the turkeys they found in the wooded northeast area where they settled. We assume they snapped wishbones at the first Thanksgiving in 1621.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_8050616_make-wish-wishbone.htm
Making a wish on a wishbone dates back 2,400 years to the Etruscans in Italy, according to Charles Panati, author of the book, "Extraordinary Origins of Everyday Things." They believed the cock and hen were soothsayers who could predict the future and practiced a tradition called the "hen oracle," which was similar to the Ouija board, but with a hen and grains of corn. When one of these sacred birds were killed, the collarbone was dried and the Etruscans stroked it to make a wish. There were only a few sacred fowl collarbones to go around, thus starting the practice of breaking them. The Romans brought the tradition to England, where it is referred to as a "merrythought." The Pilgrims brought the tradition to America, using the turkeys they found in the wooded northeast area where they settled. We assume they snapped wishbones at the first Thanksgiving in 1621.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_8050616_make-wish-wishbone.html
Making a wish on a wishbone dates back 2,400 years to the Etruscans in Italy, according to Charles Panati, author of the book, "Extraordinary Origins of Everyday Things." They believed the cock and hen were soothsayers who could predict the future and practiced a tradition called the "hen oracle," which was similar to the Ouija board, but with a hen and grains of corn. When one of these sacred birds were killed, the collarbone was dried and the Etruscans stroked it to make a wish. There were only a few sacred fowl collarbones to go around, thus starting the practice of breaking them. The Romans brought the tradition to England, where it is referred to as a "merrythought." The Pilgrims brought the tradition to America, using the turkeys they found in the wooded northeast area where they settled. We assume they snapped wishbones at the first Thanksgiving in 1621.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_8050616_make-wish-wishbone.html

YES
NO

How to Make a Wish on a Wishbone




How to Make a Wish on a Wishbone thumbnail
The proper way to pull a wishbone.
Making a wish on a wishbone dates back 2,400 years to the Etruscans in Italy, according to Charles Panati, author of the book, "Extraordinary Origins of Everyday Things." They believed the cock and hen were soothsayers who could predict the future and practiced a tradition called the "hen oracle," which was similar to the Ouija board, but with a hen and grains of corn. When one of these sacred birds were killed, the collarbone was dried and the Etruscans stroked it to make a wish. There were only a few sacred fowl collarbones to go around, thus starting the practice of breaking them. The Romans brought the tradition to England, where it is referred to as a "merrythought." The Pilgrims brought the tradition to America, using the turkeys they found in the wooded northeast area where they settled. We assume they snapped wishbones at the first Thanksgiving in 1621.


Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_8050616_make-wish-wishbone.htm

but never had this result before!

I thought it was worth blogging/bragging about!!!

Wishing you all wonderful weekend.



for a bit of history on making a wish on a wishbone!

2 comments:

Karena Albert said...

Terri have a wonderful weekend full of wishes come true!

xoxo
Karena
The Arts by Karena

La Dolfina said...

Thank you Karena!
You are definitely the SWEETEST person in the world!!!!
I hope you are enjoying a beautiful Fall weekend as well :)